1868-11-24: Bolado sells 562.5 Acres of Rancho Santa Ana to Arques

Tuesday, November 24, 1868 – Joaquin Bolado sells to José G. Arques, both of San Francisco, a complex description of 562.50 acres of Rancho Santa Ana, for $4,218.75 gold coin.

Deeds H, p. 304

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1868-11-19 San Justo Homestead Association sets aside 100 acres for the town of Hollister

November 19, 1868: 

From http://www.sanbenitocountychamber.com/history.htm :

Hollister

It was during this time that young Colonel William Welles Hollister arrived from the Ohio Valley with about 2,000 head of sheep. Finding the land abundant in wild oat hay, the perfect nutrition for flock and herd livestock, Hollister purchased the land that would someday bear his name. Colonel Hollister left San Benito County for Santa Barbara, selling his land, about 21,000 acres, to a newly formed group of civic-minded citizens called the San Justo Homestead Association. Since there was already an abundance of Spanish place names in the area, the Association decided to name the new town "Hollister" after the man who had sold them the property.

The Association auctioned off property to the highest bidder November 19, 1868, setting aside approximately 100 acres for the town of Hollister. This parcel was divided into blocks and lots which ran on a grid bounded by North, South, East, and West Streets. Building lots were quite narrow, so some buyers purchased two or three lots in order to build larger homes with barns, pump houses and carriage houses. A corner lot sold for the impressive sum of $200 while other lots sold for $100 each.

Growth in the new town proceeded rapidly with new homes and businesses springing up. On August 29, 1872, Hollister was officially incorporated as a city and by 1874 had secured its place as the most important city in the area when San Benito County was formed and Hollister was named the county seat.

Published in: on November 19, 1868 at 9:28 am  Leave a Comment  

1868-11-14: Bolado/Arques vs. MacDougall et. al: Summons Issued

Bolado Arques vs MacDougall et al. (Anzar heirs). Summons issued.

Published in: on November 14, 1868 at 10:16 am  Leave a Comment  

1868-11-14: Joaquin Bolado and José G. Arques sue Anzar et. al. over Partition of 1848

Saturday, November 14, 1868 – Joaquin Bolado and José G. Arques sue Anzar et. al.

Describes history and borders, describing partition, how the patent was awarded, and that the partition previously made was fair and just, but now the defendants (the Anzars) now ignore the partition.

Bolado and Arques claim that if the partition is not valid, then they are the owners of one undivided half of all lands patented, and the defendant MacDougall is the owner of one undivided 12th part and minors Juan Francisco Anzar, Anatolio Anzar and Policronio de Guadalupe Anzar are each the owner of 5 undivided 36th parts thereof.

That the defendant Anzars contend that the patent vested in each of the defendants the title to one undivided 5th part and Manuel Larios and his successors the remaining 1/5th part.

That the patent is a cloud upon plaintiffs' title, that they are ready and willing to convey to defendants all interest in the Quien Sabe.

Prays decree that Patent award one half for the benefit of defendants, half for Larios and successors.

Attorneys Peckham and Payne.

v. 2 p 227-244.

Bolado/Arques suit claimed that the Patent didn't declare the interest that each of the patentees was to take, but granted severally to all.

But under said partition, Manuel Larios and his successors (Bolado & Arques) were and are the owners of the Santa Ana, and Defendants (Anzar et. al.) were and are the owners of the Quien Sabe

That the partition is just, and equal and valid in equity; that defendants give out and pretended that the same was not a valid partition and now refuse to recognize the same.

v.2 p. 242

If the partition is not valid, Bolado/Arques own an undivided half of all lands patented; that MacDougall owns one undivided 12/th, the 3 Anzar heirs each own 5 undivided 36ths parts thereof.

Defendants contend that the patent vested in each of the Defendants the title to one undivided 5th part and Larios and his successors the remaining 1/5th part.

That the patent is a cloud upon Plaintiff's title; that they are ready and willing to convey all interest in Quien sabe.

v.2 p.243

Prays decree that Patent award one half for the benefit of Defendants (Bolado/Arques) and half for the benefit of Manual Larios and his successors.

That Defendants shall execute conveyances that vest in Plaintiffs a full and complete title to half of all the right, title and interest which passed from the Government of the United States to the grantees by said letters patent.

That the court decree that the instrument of 2/13/1848 was sufficient partition and the Plaintiffs will be said to be the owners in severalty of Santa Ana if the partition is true.

1868-11-04: Bolado & Arques sell 500 acres of Rancho Santa Ana to Doern

Wednesday, November 4, 1868: Joaquin Bolado and Joseph G. Arques to Antonio Doern of Santa Clara for $7,500 gold coin; 500 acres except for public highway.

Book G. p. 592

Recorded 9:04 AM Monday, November 30, 1868 

1868-11-04: Bolado & Arques sell 345 Acres of Rancho Santa Ana to Maples

Wednesday, November 4, 1868 – Joaquin Bolado and Joseph G. Arques grant to Thompson W. Maples of Santa Clara for $8,625 a portion of Rancho Santa Ana 345 acres except for public highway.

Book G. p. 589

Recorded 9:02 AM Monday, November 30, 1868 

1868-11-04: Bolado & Arques sell 259+ Acres of Rancho Santa Ana to Reed

Wednesday, November 4, 1868 – Joaquin Bolado and José G. Arques grant to William J. Reed of Santa Clara for $6,489.50 in gold coin a (very complex) portion of Rancho Santa Ana of 259.58 acres.

Book G. p. 586

Bolado Reed Deed 1868

Recorded: 9 AM Monday, November 30, 1868