1868-08-24: Bolado, Arques & Castaños sell to Rucker & Weller 528+ Acres of Rancho Santa Ana

Monday, August 24, 1868 – Joaquin Bolado, José G. Arques, Bartolome Castaños of San Francisco deed to Joseph E. Rucker & H.O. Weller of Santa Clara for consideration $4230 gold coin a portion of Rancho Santa Ana: 528 & 85/00ths acres

Book G p. 465

1867-08-26: Recording of Sale of Minor Heirs’ shares of Rancho Santa Ana y Quien Sabe to Bolado & Arques

Monday, August 26, 1867 – Joaquin Bolado was granted from minor heirs Patrocinio Larios, Estolano Larios by Frederick A. MacDougall guardian of estate for Manuel Larios; to Joaquin Bolado & Arques.

Book F. p. 637 – July 9, 1867

[See also a transaction dated 9/21/1867]

Probate court made an order of sale August 8th 1867 at 10am

It was recorded in Book A of Miscellaneous Records, pages 124;

Auction took place 8/9/67 in front of Plaza Hotel; etc.

Arques bid $2,233.33 for 1/3rd

Bolado bid $4,466.67 for 2/3rd

each minor owned an undivided portion of the combined Rancho Santa Ana y Quien Sabe equal to 2,047 acres.

Recorded at the request of José Abrego, Joaquin Bolado’s father-in-law.

libr F p. 637

1843-03: First Piano Landed in California Purchased by Don José Abrego

The following is the text of a clipping found in one of Julia Bolado’s scrapbooks of a letter to the editor that she wrote to the San Francisco Chronicle April 14, 1931.

. . .

Headline: “An Early Source of Seguidillas”

Editor the Chronicle:

Sir: The following inscription is written under the cover of the first piano that landed in California, purchased by my grandfather, Don José Abrego, a piano which I have in my house.

First Piano Shipped to California

“This is one of the first three pianos brought to California. Its history is as follows: In 1841 Captain Stephen Smith arrived with his vessel in Monterey and I engaged him to bring me a piano on his next trip to this country. In March, 1843, he returned to this city in a brigantine; he had three pianos on board. I bought this one of him for $600. He then sailed to San Francisco, where General Vallejo purchased another of the pianos. The third one was afterward sold by Captain Smith to [Eulogio F. de Celis] of Los Angeles.”

Dulce Bolado Davis (née Julia Bolado)

Tres Pinos, April 14, 1931

. . .

From:

Memorial And Biographical History Of The Coast Counties Of Central California, 1893, p.79:REMINISCENCES OF MRS. ABREGO.

One of the most interesting personages now (1892) living in Monterey, is Doña Josefa Estrada de Abrego, widow of Don Jose Abrego. Although Mrs. Abrego was born in 1814, in Monterey, and has borne eighteen children; and although her eyesight fails her, so that she is only able to recognize her acquaintances by the sound of their voices, she is still as fair and youthful in her appearance as though she were only fifty-eight or less, instead of seventy-eight; and she moves about the various rooms of her spacious home in which she has lived ever since her marriage, fifty-six years ago, with the ease and precision of a maiden of twenty.

Her husband, Don Jose Abrego, was born in the city of Mexico, in 1813, and came to Monterey in 1835, with the colony, on the Natalia, a portion of the timbers of which historic vessel he had built into his house. [Mrs. Abrego’s father, Raimundo, and a brother, Mariano Estrada, were brought from Mexico when mere boys, by Governor Luis Arrillaga, who reared and educated them.] [The preceeding text was crossed out, followed by a handwritten note in the book, written by Julia (Dulce) Bolado, saying “All were born in California”]. Mr. and Mrs. Abrego were married in 1836, and moved at once into a part of the house (which he had built, and to which additions were afterward made), in which she has ever since lived, and in which all her children were born. Don Jose died some fifteen years ago. Of their children, only four sons and one daughter are still living. One daughter, the beautiful and accomplished Mrs. Bolado, died within the present year, 1892.

Mrs. Abrego has in her home one of the first pianofortes ever brought to California. A paper on the inside of it, written by Mr. Abrego, says:

“In 1841, Captain Stephen Smith arrived with his vessel in Monterey, and I engaged him to bring me a piano on his next trip to this country.

“In March, 1843, he returned to this city in a brigantine; he had three pianos on board. I bought this one of him for $600. He then sailed to San Francisco, where General Vallejo purchased another of the pianos. The third one was afterward sold by Captain Smith to E. de Celis at Los Angeles.”

The Abrego piano is a six-octave, made by “Breitkopt & Hartel,” “Leipzig;” “imported by Brauns & Focke, Baltimore.”

http://ftp.rootsweb.com/pub/usgenweb/ca/monterey/history/1893/memorial/chapterx178gms.txt

http://www.breitkopf.com

. . .

“In 1845-6 Stephen Smith of Bodega obtained a fifty vara lot on the southeast corner of Dupont and Washington streets where he built a wooden house. In 1846 he leased it to Sam Brannan who lived and published the Star there. Smith was a native of Maryland and came to California first from Peru in 1841. He obtained permission of Governor Alvarado to set up a steam saw-mill with a promise of land suitable for his operations. He brought the mill machinery from Baltimore in 1843, and with it also three pianos, the first steam mill and the first pianos in California. In 1844 he was naturalized and received from Micheltorena a grant of eight leagues of land at Bodega and there he set up his mill.”

http://www.sfgenealogy.com/sf/history/hbbeg15.htm

http://www.maritimeheritage.org/captains/stephenSmith.htm

http://www.sfgenealogy.com/sf/history/hgybw.htm

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/West_coast_lumber_trade

http://www.calarchives4u.com/history/sonoma/sect1.htm

Note: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seguidilla

Published in: on March 1, 1843 at 3:02 pm  Leave a Comment