1864-03-09: Roeding granted to Lynch for $1000 one half of one undivided 20th of Santa Ana and Quien Sabe

Wednesday, March 9, 1864: Frederick Roeding granted to Francisco E. Lynch for $1000 all of his right title etc. of one half of one undivided 20th of Santa Ana and Quien Sabe.

Book E p. 581, v. 1 p. 47

1863-10-07: Horace Hawes granted to Frederick A. MacDougall (an unknown parcel of land)

Wednesday, October 7, 1863: Horace Hawes granted to Frederick A. MacDougall (an unknown parcel of land).

Book E. p. 482

1860-05-01: President James Buchanan issues patent for Rancho Santa Ana y Quien Sabe

Tuesday, May 1, 1860 – President James Buchanan in Washington issues United States patent for the Rancho Santa Ana y Quien Sabe grant. The patent was issued for the combined ranch — and it described its boundaries — to Manuel Larios et. al (including the heirs of Juan Miguel Anzar: Frederick A. MacDougall, Anatolio Anzar, Juan Francisco Anzar and Policronio Anzar).

The grant was originally issued Monday, April 8, 1839 by Governor of Alta California Juan B. Alvarado to claimants Manuel Larios and Juan Miguel Anzar.

California State Map ID number: MC 4:4-574 Grant number: 237.

Book A Patents p 55-62.

“To all whom these presents shall come: Greeting”

Book 1 pp. 9-23

NOTE FROM THE BOLADO/ARQUES SUIT, V2 P. 253: THAT THE LANDS GRANTED INCLUDE ONLY A PART OF THE LANDS PETITIONED FOR, AND A PART ONLY OF THAT DESCRIBED IN THE DECREE OF THE DISTRICT COURT.

http://www.lib.berkeley.edu/EART/rancho.html

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/James_Buchanan

1859-05-03: Survey of Divided Santa Ana and Quien Sabe Ranches approved

Tuesday, May 3, 1859 – Survey of the divided ranches for the United States excluded an equal amount of land from both Santa Ana and Quien Sabe ranches; the survey was finally approved by the Surveyor General and the lands embraced in the survey are the same as in the Patent.

Abstract v.2 p. 253

That the area of Rancho Santa Anita north of said division line is 31,000 Acres; that the area of Rancho Quien Sabe is 17822.60 Acres.

That Rancho Santa Ana contains more agricultural lands than Rancho Quien Sabe and is of more easy access. The pastoral lands are of equal value acre for acre, but from 1851 to 1865 Quien Sabe was the best cattle rancho because it was easier to keep cattle in it and they could range from the mountains which divides from Santa Ana as far as the San Joaquin River.

Bolado/Arques suit v2 p.254.- Sept 8, 1870 (?)

1858-12-15: Horace Hawes grants 1/20th of Santa Anita & Quien Sabe to Lynch & Roeding

Wednesday, December 15, 1858 – Horace Hawes grants his undivided 1/20th of Rancho Santa Anita and Quien Sabe to Francis E. Lynch & Frederick Roeding for $3000

book D. p. 116.

This was referred to in Hawes’ grant to Thomas Benton Jones.
Abstract v.1 p. 43

1856-04-07: Anzar estate: affadavit of publication filed

Anzar estate: affadavit of publication filed

Abstract v.2 p.195

1855-07-20: Maria Castro de Anzar Estate: Frederick MacDougall resigns as administrator

Friday, July 20, 1855: Maria Castro de Anzar Estate: Frederick MacDougall resigns as administrator of Maria de Anzar’s estate, requests that public administrator take charge.

Charles G. Harron appointed.

Abstract v.2 p.206

1855-05-30: Court substitued MacDougall as party claimant in place of Maria Castro de Anzar de MacDougal

Sometime in 1855 or 1856: The U.S. District Court substitued Frederick A. MacDougall as party claimant in place of Maria Castro de Anzar de MacDougall – this happened before 12/12/1856.

1855-05-30: Maria Antonia Castro de Anzar de MacDougall died intestate in San Juan

Wednesday, May 30, 1855 – Maria Antonia Castro de Anzar de MacDougall died intestate in San Juan. She died after inheriting 1/2 of the undivided Rancho Santa Ana y Quien Sabe from her husband, Juan Miguel Anzar, who died October 29th, 1852.

(At the time of his death, Juan Miguel Anzar believed that he owned the Rancho Quien Sabe partition of the Rancho Santa Ana y Quien Sabe; but it was later determined that he (and his estate) owned 1/2 the undivided combined rancho, per a later decision of the US Board of Land Commissioners 11/7/1854)

Maria Antonia Castro de Anzar de MacDougall died owning 1/2 (3/6ths) of Rancho Quien Sabe; the other half was owned by her 3 children.

Each minor receives 1/3 of 2/3 of her 1/2 share; which is an additional 1/9th of Rancho Quien Sabe.

(MacDougall got the other 1/3rd of Maria’s 1/2 share)

Bolado/Arques suit, v2 p. 252.

Abstract v.2 p. 212

1854-12-26: Anzar estate – Inventory and appraisment filed – Order of Distribution

Anzar estate: Inventory and appraisment of estate of filed. Each 1/6th is worth ($1,666.66) per appraisers Johnson & Harris, verified by MacDougall.

Order of Distribution – the final accounts of this estate having been settled and an order made for the payment of all debts and; petition for distribution having been duly made to this court; (to be held in common until partition):

To widow Maria Antonia Castro de MacDougall one undivided half of the Rancho Quien Sabe containing 4 square leagues more or less and other property;

To the minor heirs each one undivided one sixth – to be held in common until partition by metes and bounds.

A prob min p.195 v. 2 pp 191-193

1854-12-22: Anzar estate – Affadavit of publication of notice to creditors filed

Friday, December 22, 1854: Anzar estate – Affadavit of publication of notice to creditors of estate of Juan Miguel Anzar filed.

San Francisco Times and Transcript newspaper published notice 5/30/1853 to 6/30/1853; printed notice attached.

1854-11-08: Anzar estate: final account of Anzar estate executor filed

Wednesday, November 8, 1854: Anzar estate: final account of Juan Miguel Anzar estate executor filed.

A prob. min 191.

Petition for settlement of final account filed.

Notice of hearing and certificate of posting filed.

Abstract v.2 p.190

1854-11-07: Bolado/Arques suit: Board of Land Commissioners: Anzar heirs substituted as claimants

Tuesday, November 7, 1854: Per the Joaquin Bolado/JG Arques suit:

BEFORE THIS DATE Juan Miguel Anzar's will entered probate

Abstract: v.2 p.237, 252 (it was documented as actually happening 2/3/1853 or 2/23 – Abstract v.2 p. 171)

ON THIS DATE, devisees were substituted as claimants by the Board of Land Commissioners with Manuel Larios – 11/7/1854:

The Board of Land Commissioners:

The joint Larios/Anzar claim (Rancho Santa Ana y Quien Sabe) was bounded: commencing at the northwest corner of a place called El Lomito del Corral Viejo (lomito means little hill) and running thence easterly towards the Cañada (gorge) des Pecachos in the line of the place called San Joaquin (Later entries say Rancho San Felipe; Abstact v.2 p.240) to the base of the range of the mountain called Quien Sabe, thence along the base of said mountains southerly to the Arroyo de Joaquin Soto, thence down said arroyo to its junction with the stream called Arroyo del Puerto del Rosario. Thence down said stream to a crossing of wagon Road to San Juan and thence by a place called Loma de en Media (?) to the place of beginning.

And said land was confirmed as one undivided half to Larios and the other undivided half to the Anzar heirs. (The 1848 Partition was disregarded). Abstract v.2 p. 238

Appeal was made to the District Court of the US in the Southern District, it was pending and undecided until 12/12/1856.

Abstract v.2 p. 238-9

1854-07-25: Frederick A. MacDougall married Maria Antonia Castro de Anzar

Tuesday, July 25, 1854 – Frederick A. MacDougall married Maria Antonia Castro de Anzar, wife of the deceased Juan Miguel Anzar, owner of Rancho Quien Sabe.

(MacDougall later inherited 1/3 of her 1/2 share which is 1 undivided 6th of Quien Sabe.

Her heirs inherited the other 2/3rds.)

NOTE: But according to later court decisions, Quien Sabe hadn't been separated from Rancho Santa Ana.

Abstract v.2 p 209, 211

Abstract v.2 p. 203 & 239

Bolado/Arques suit, v.2 p.252

1853-11-19: Hawes Receives from Larios One Tenth of [Unknown Parcel]

Saturday, November 19, 1853 – Horace Hawes, Lawyer, receives from Don Manuel Larios, for legal help with the land commission for Ranchito de San Antonio near the Pueblo de San Juan Bautista; one tenth (decimo) of the confirmed territory (what territory?) (in Spanish).

Agreements, Book A, p. 54.

NOTE: Did Horace Hawes own 1/10th of the Quien Sabe that he bought from William Carey Jones (which could have actually been 1/20th of the combined Santa Ana y Quien Sabe); and this new 1/10th of Manuel Larios’ Santa Ana (which was also still a part of the combined ranch?)? If so, then he owned 1/10th of the combined Santa Ana y Quien Sabe ranch.

1853-10-25: William Carey Jones sold his share (of 1 undivided tenth of Quien Sabe) to Horace Hawes.

Tuesday, October 25, 1853 – William Carey Jones sold his share (of 1 undivided tenth of Quien Sabe) to Horace Hawes.

Abstract v.2 p.218, p. 216.

See also 9/1/1854

NOTE: But was it really 1 undivided 20th of the combined ranch? Because the ranch was later found to be a contiguous whole; and not divided between Rancho Santa Ana and Rancho Quien Sabe.

1853-05-30: Anzar estate – newspaper published notice

Monday, May 30, 1853: Times and Transcript newspaper of San Francisco published notice.

1853-05-24: Anzar estate: Order of notice to creditors to be published

Anzar estate: Order of notice to creditors to be published four successive weeks in the Times Transcript, a daily newspaper published in San Francisco, there being no newspaper published in this county

1853-04-02: Anzar estate: Appraisers MacDougall and Castellano qualified

Saturday, April 2, 1853 – Anzar estate: Appraisers MacDougall and Castellano qualified.

1848-02-13: Partition of Santa Ana y Quien Sabe Attempted

Partition was attempted: Quien Sabe for Anzar, Santa Ana for Larios.

Abstract v.2 p. 231 – per Bolado/Arques suit of 1869.

Executed in San Juan Bautista.

Agreements Book A, p. 63 and 67 (both in Spanish)

NOTE: v. 1 p.167 says it was Feb. 3, not 13th.

The dividing Line between Santa Ana and Quien Sabe was supposed to be:

v.2 p.230: From the creek called Arroyo del Pecacho running along the summit of the mountains or ridge which separated the two places in all the meandering of the said ridge passing by the place called Aguage (watering place?) del Clerigo, leaving in the side of Juan Anzar the place called Llanitos and there turning and running to a point called Puerto del Rosario.

1848: Francisco Serrano Surveys Santa Ana y Quien Sabe with Anzar and Larios

Juan Miguel Anzar and Manuel Larios engaged Francisco Serrano as a scrivener to go with them to the Ranchos take notes of boundaries and make partition and both went with him and and pointed out the line which they agreed upon as a dividing line.

This line corresponded exactly with the line described in the instrument hereinafter mentioned (describes line); all returned to the house of the Aromas rancho where Serrano made a rough draft of the agreement, read it to them, they agreed to it and aferwards Serrano reduced it to its present shape (as in complaint) and the instrument was kept by Serrano.

That before going to the Rancho, it was agreed that each should pay to Serrano 1/2 the value of his services.

That neither said anything about payment after they came from the Ranchos, no payment was made and no copy of original document delivered and said original was kept by the said Serrano until three or four years after the death of said Anzar when Larios sent his son to Serrano at the said town of Monterey to obtain the instrument and upon paying Serrano $100 for his services in and about the business, Serrano delivered the document to the son who gave it to his father and it has ever since been in the custody of Manuel Larios and his representatives.

That after the signing of the document and in 1848, the cattle and horses of Juan Miguel Anzar were gathered up and taken on to the Quien Sabe where corrals were built and houses for his servants and the cattle &c. of Larios were gathered up and taken on to the Santa Ana. The cattle of both roaming however over the mountain range at will, but separation was made and cattle marked at certain times.

That the Anzar house on Santa Ana was occupied by Hernandez to whom Anzar had let his cattle on Quien Sabe Rancho for 3 years and afterwards Anzar permitted the house to be occupied by a widow woman, and to this occupation by Anzar and his tenants Larios did not object. 

That Larios, during 1st year said premises were occupied, jointly took care of Anzar's cattle upon terms, and at end of year Larios Rodeo'd the cattle and separated Anzar's from his own and sent Anzar's to Quien Sabe pointing out to the Brothers Higuen who took charge of them the dividing line mentioned in said instrument. 

That ever since the death of Anzar, the said Rodeo line has been observed. 

Dividing Line between Santa Ana and Quien Sabe was supposed to be:
From the creek called Arroyo del Pecacho running along the summit of the mountains or ridge which separated the two places in all the meandering of the said ridge passing by the place called Aguage (watering place?) del Clerigo, leaving in the side of Juan Anzar the place called Llanitos and there turning and running to a point called Puerto del Rosario.

Abstract, v.2 p.230

1840-05-21: Santa Ana y Quien Sabe Grant Approved by Departmental Junta

Thursday, May 21, 1840: The Santa Ana y Quien Sabe grant was approved by Departmental Junta of the Territory of Upper California.

Abstract V2. P. 250, v.2 p.230 v.2 p.230
(for $50.00)
V.1 p.41

San Benito County: District Court Files – Book N. Page 86 (46-86)

1839-04-09: US District Court’s Interpretation of Grant of Santa Ana y Quien Sabe

A grant was made by the governor to Juan Miguel Anzar and Manuel Larios which vested in them jointly and in equal shares an inchoate and imperfect but equitable title in and to the lands called Santa Ana and Quien Sabe.

That said grant referred to said maps mentioned in finding No 14 but the grant does not otherwise specify either the extent or boundaries of the said Ranchos or either of them.

That the grant contains the usual conditions and reservations the surplus after making the juridicial measurement therein provided to be made to the nation and if any of the conditions be contravened that said lands may be denounced by another.

That said lands were granted as one tract.

That no juridicial possession was ever given or survey made until the making and final approval of the United States Survey hereinafter mentioned.

That the quantity of lands granted was not ascertained until 12 December 1856 where the final decree of said United States District Court was made.

Abstract, v2. p.249-50

1839-03-30: Anzar and Larios request Quien Sabe to be added to their claim

Manuel Larios and Juan Miguel Anzar presented to the prefect of the "1s" District their joint petition in which they recited their former petition on the 29th December 1839 and pray in addition for Quien Sabe.

That neither of said petitioners contained any further description of said Ranchos, than in the petition of the Negretes and none of them make mention of the quantity of land in either or both of said pieces.

Prefect ordered petitions of Anzar and Larios to be attached.

Abstract, v2. p.249

(more…)

1834: Quien Sabe and Santa Ana Alta California lands were unclaimed

In 1834 there were two tracts of unclaimed lands, Quien Sabe and Santa Ana, unlimited in quantity.

Abstract: V2 p. 247 – U.S. District Court findings.